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  • Flying fungi February 4, 2019
    Meet the red-cockaded woodpecker, a black and white bird with a real knack for making holes in living pine trees. Read on to learn of its incredible relationship with a shelf fungus that eats the heartwood of those same pines.
    Student X
  • Connecting the Rusts November 19, 2018
    Rust fungi are formidable plant pathogens that have big impacts in agriculture and natural ecosystems. Plant pathologist J.C. Arthur took up the great challenge of figuring out their life cycles.
    Kathie Hodge
  • An unlikely delicacy: the basket stinkhorn February 18, 2015
    This isn't the first post you've seen here about stinkhorns. They've just got that special something. In the Western hemisphere, they're wonderfully disgusting. In the East, they're wonderfully delicious. Let's explore.
    Student X
  • Hope for Impatiens September 10, 2014
    How a familiar garden flower, through sex, sheer luck, and the attention of one man, rose to a pinnacle of popularity only to be suddenly destroyed. All thanks to an unassuming downy mildew that was literally lurking in the shadows.
    Student X
  • Twinkly earthstars June 3, 2014
    Fungi are secretive and elusive things. It's hard to get to know them. They expose themselves shyly, briefly, and often bafflingly. Like these twinkly earthstars, which are hiding more than one secret.
    Kathie Hodge
  • Ladybug Fungi January 17, 2014
    They may be taking over the world, but they have problems too: They have an itch they can't scratch. Their dead wear fur coats. They nuke their competitors with poisonous blood. Multicolored Asian ladybugs are host to three different fungi. They're all bizarre and interesting, but if you are a ladybug, you will have a […]
    Kathie Hodge
  • A deadly Russula December 30, 2013
    My students think of Russula species as cheerful mushrooms that are quite benign. They are often pleasingly colored, make good partners for trees, and have an interesting, brittle texture. Other than being practically impossible to identify, what's not to like? But in eastern Asia, one Russula species kills half of the people who eat it.
    Kathie Hodge
  • Learning fungi December 19, 2013
    Fungi can be so unfamiliar in all their diverse forms and weird habits. Here's a beautiful coffee table book to help you grasp the enormous diversity of the kingdom Fungi.
    Kathie Hodge
  • How fungi grew on Cesalpino November 1, 2013
    Cesalpino would not have been surprised to find mold growing on his own book, published in 1583. However, he would have disagreed with us about the nature of fungi and where they come from. Also, if fungi have souls, where do they keep them?
    Kathie Hodge